Can satisfied with life people be unwilling to live?

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Positive psychology is an umbrella term for models and exploration about what makes life most worthy living. Even though positive experiences such as a satisfied life are among the central concerns of positive psychology, no studies were conducted to evaluate whether people, who express unwillingness to live, still can experience positive emotions and states, for example, gratitude, compassion, or happiness. Many countries in the world are considering legislation on suicide with help, and there is an opinion that a person who chooses death can reflect on his situation constructively, and he is still capable to experience positive emotions. From psychological point of view, could it be said that people unwilling to live should have a right not to live (even more, should be helped not to live) as they still can judge critically and their decisions are not emotionally biased?According to the latest statistics (2012) from the World Health Organization, 61, 3 men and 10, 4 women per 100,000 inhabitants commit suicide in Lithuania annually. Therefore, we have chosen highest suicide rates in Europe manifesting Lithuanian population as a target group; moreover, Lithuanians‘ cognitions towards life and death as well as unwillingness to live still have not been explored thoroughly. This paper presents some results of the survey (representative sample, n=1002) which was conducted in Lithuania in February – April 2014. Based on the findings of various authors, the research aimed at exploring the link between unwillingness to live, certain attitudes towards life and emotional states. The present study showed thatunwillingness to live is statistically significantly related to negative emotional states and cognitions.
    Therefore, regarding the suicides with help, the opinion that a person who chooses death can reflect on his situation constructively, and he is still capable to experience positive emotions, is not evidence – based. Nonetheless, supplementary research is needed to explore further the different factors contributing to unwillingness to live which is a sign of diminished psychological wellbeing.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)50-60
    JournalJournal of psychology and behavioral science
    Volume3
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    suicide
    emotion
    Lithuania
    death
    cognition
    experience
    psychology
    suicide rate
    human being
    target group
    happiness
    WHO
    inhabitant
    legislation
    statistics
    evidence

    Keywords

    • Unwillingness to live
    • Emotional states
    • Suicides

    Cite this

    Can satisfied with life people be unwilling to live? / Dirzyte, Aiste.

    In: Journal of psychology and behavioral science, Vol. 3, No. 1, 2015, p. 50-60.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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