Cross-contextual stability of bullying victimization

A person-oriented analysis of cyber and traditional bullying experiences among adolescents

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Using a person-oriented approach the study examined whether bullying victimization at school continued into cyberspace victimization in a large sample of high school students in Lithuania (N=1667, 58% girls), age 15-19 (M=17.29, SD=0.95). Three forms of traditional bullying (verbal, physical and relational) and seven forms of cyberbullying victimization through cell phones and computers were included in the analysis. The findings revealed that 35% of traditional bullying victims were also bullied in cyberspace. In particular, adolescents who experienced predominantly verbal and relational bullying at school, showed a higher risk of victimization in cyberspace a year later, while this was not observed for predominantly physical forms of traditional bullying. The findings point to the importance of a cross-contextual perspective in studies on stability of bullying victimization.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)181-190
    Number of pages10
    JournalScandinavian Journal of Psychology
    Volume53
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

    Fingerprint

    Bullying
    Crime Victims
    Lithuania
    Cell Phones
    Person
    Victimization
    Contextual
    Students
    Cyberspace

    Keywords

    • Adolescents
    • Bullying
    • Cyberbullying
    • Cybervictimization
    • Person-oriented approach
    • Victimization

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychology(all)
    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Developmental and Educational Psychology

    Cite this

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    title = "Cross-contextual stability of bullying victimization: A person-oriented analysis of cyber and traditional bullying experiences among adolescents",
    abstract = "Using a person-oriented approach the study examined whether bullying victimization at school continued into cyberspace victimization in a large sample of high school students in Lithuania (N=1667, 58{\%} girls), age 15-19 (M=17.29, SD=0.95). Three forms of traditional bullying (verbal, physical and relational) and seven forms of cyberbullying victimization through cell phones and computers were included in the analysis. The findings revealed that 35{\%} of traditional bullying victims were also bullied in cyberspace. In particular, adolescents who experienced predominantly verbal and relational bullying at school, showed a higher risk of victimization in cyberspace a year later, while this was not observed for predominantly physical forms of traditional bullying. The findings point to the importance of a cross-contextual perspective in studies on stability of bullying victimization.",
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