Liquid drugs and high dead space syringes may keep HIV and HCV prevalence high - A comparison of Hungary and Lithuania

V. Anna Gyarmathy, Alan Neaigus, Nan Li, Eszter Ujhelyi, Irma Caplinskiene, Saulius Caplinskas, Carl A. Latkin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Despitevery similar political, drug policy and HIV prevention backgrounds, HIV and HCV prevalence is considerably different in Hungary (low HIV and moderate HCV prevalence) and Lithuania (high HCV and moderate HIV prevalence). Wecompared the drug use profile of Hungarian (n = 215) and Lithuanian (n = 300) injecting drug users (IDUs). Overall, compared with IDUs in Hungary, IDUs in Lithuania often injected opiates purchased in liquid form ('shirka'), used and shared 2-piece syringes (vs. 1-piece syringes) disproportionately more often, were less likely to acquire their syringes from legal sources and had significantly more experience with injected and less experience with non-injected drugs. It may not be liquid drugs per se that contribute to a higher prevalence of HCV and/or HIV, but it is probably factors associated with the injecting of liquid drugs, such as the wide-spread use and sharing of potentially contaminated 2-piece syringes acquired often from non-legal sources, and syringe-mediated drug sharing with 2-piece syringes. Scaling up substitution therapy, especially heroin replacement, combined with reducing the supply of liquid drugs may decrease the prevalence of high-risk injecting behaviours related to the injecting of liquid drugs and drug injecting-related infections among IDUs in Lithuania.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)220-228
    Number of pages9
    JournalEuropean Addiction Research
    Volume16
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010

    Fingerprint

    Lithuania
    Hungary
    Syringes
    HIV
    drug
    Pharmaceutical Preparations
    Drug Users
    Opiate Alkaloids
    Heroin
    Risk-Taking
    drug policy
    risk behavior
    scaling
    substitution
    drug use
    experience

    Keywords

    • Drugs sold in liquid form
    • Hungary
    • Injecting drug use
    • Lithuania
    • Syringe type

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Psychiatry and Mental health
    • Health(social science)

    Cite this

    Liquid drugs and high dead space syringes may keep HIV and HCV prevalence high - A comparison of Hungary and Lithuania. / Gyarmathy, V. Anna; Neaigus, Alan; Li, Nan; Ujhelyi, Eszter; Caplinskiene, Irma; Caplinskas, Saulius; Latkin, Carl A.

    In: European Addiction Research, Vol. 16, No. 4, 09.2010, p. 220-228.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Gyarmathy, V. Anna ; Neaigus, Alan ; Li, Nan ; Ujhelyi, Eszter ; Caplinskiene, Irma ; Caplinskas, Saulius ; Latkin, Carl A. / Liquid drugs and high dead space syringes may keep HIV and HCV prevalence high - A comparison of Hungary and Lithuania. In: European Addiction Research. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 220-228.
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